Liz Randall's Cycling Blog - a life behind bars

"With ordinary talents and extraordinary perseverance, all things are attainable"



Monday, 10 November 2008

Geelong Classic Charity Ride


Bald facts: cost $35 for 152km, head wind max 31.5kph, steepest grade 18.2%...on the Great Ocean Road, not over the big long hill after all, calories burnt-2500, skin burnt..north side only. Do it again...NO!

memo to self..get altitude fixed you knucklehead!

Details: we knew people who knew people who were organising the ride so went to the very front of the front 50 riders. The pace (into a stiff head wind) was fierce and relentless and very soon we drifted back. I didn't feel happy in the group as its pace yo-yo'd for no apparent reason and after a downhill s bend followed by an up hill, the elastic snapped which left me as the engine for what seemed like a VERY long time. It was hard yakka but eventually the first check point turned up and we regrouped.

Then the ground turned upward and I was with Pip Read for a while. Pip had been ill with a virus..off work for 2 weeks even and didn't plan to do the whole ride. I could just about keep up with Pip riding uphill in her weakened state until once again there was the sound of snapping elastic. The problem with this climb was that I had no idea how long it was and how many false flats there were...and there were a few. The downhill hoon was next on the list..I dont enjoy long downhills at the best of times as I end up with a sore neck and this time it was even worse cos I realised that with the new bike set up I struggled to reach the brake levers when on the drops...... nice views though.


I never like stopping on a ride as my body seizes up and I struggle to regain rhythm so I was into urge mode every time we stopped although at Lorne I could happily have stayed put the rest of the day, provided someone came and picked me up. The sun, the sea, the beach etc etc etc.

From that point on with occasional flashes of my true riding ability, I changed from the driver to the wimpering caboose. I started cramping almost straightaway, first in the usual location, my left calf, then my right calf then both quads. I was ok putting out about 140 watts, but anything more than that and my legs went into spasm mode.

"How far now" and "are we nearly there yet" became my preferred conversation when in strife, "I spy with my little eye", when I was cruising. On the flats I could get up to speed, but face me with a small tilting of the land and I was history.

Lawrence, the SMS absolutely everywhere queen and I complement each other in our areas of riding skill, so when she can put in a burst of speed that has me looking on in awe, I know that given a few hundred metres, I will have caught up and continued on and on and on and on. Our styles of pedalling differ too, oddly enough for a trackie, she's a great one for pedalling and coasting, whereas I, the TT'er will pedal pedal pedal pedal.

The ride ended and back at the car I discovered I had lost the car keys. I rang the RACV lady who said they'd have to get a locksmith to cut me a new set. She also said it might be cheaper to get a taxi home and back with my spare set which had me wondering how much the new set would cost as I was ~110km from home!!! anyhow they'd been found and I got them back, so that was a huge relief.

Sleep did not come easy last night as I'd loaded up with caffeine on the way home in order to stay awake. Sleep WILL come easy tonight and in fact could easily over take me right now....zzzzzz

2 comments:

Lawrence said...

18.2% on the Great Ocean Rd section?? Woohooo :-)I am the queen!! heheh And we even complement each other in terms of when our bodies fail ;-) each end of the ride.

As for I spy, I give up. That game is far too hard after 110km of riding!!

asfastasicanforaslongasican said...

yup NB (nice bottom) and TP (telegraph pole) were way beyond you as was S (sign). But then B (bitumen) was far too hard for me!!!

Sad.